09 August 2014

Kathleen Springs, Watarrakah National Park, N.T.

the smaller print reads: "the fence had a spear (non-return) gate which was wired open most of the time to allow cattle to move back and forth to drink.  Come mustering time, the spear gate was closed. Cattle could move in but not out and became trapped.





















Signage from Parks and Wildlife Service read:
"to the Luritja people, the spirit of a Rainbow Serpent lives in this deep waterhole.  It protects the waterhole and others in the area which they believe are joined by underground tunnels.

The Luritja people have looked after this waterhole since the beginning of time.  They are careful not to anger the Rainbow Serpent.  Without its protection the waterhole would soon dry up.  They camp well away, approach the waterhole respectfully and never swim here."

9 comments:

Arnoya Ari said...

A current and a good series of pictures.

Irma said...

Beautiful series of pictures, Carole.
Awesome is this well in a very dry landscape.
The flowers benefit from the water, which thrive well.

Montanagirl said...

Great set of photos! I really enjoyed this post.

John @ Sinbad and I on the Loose said...

There doesn't appear to be many trees about to use for fencing material. It looks as desolate for cattle rearing as does our Southwest. My kind of country.

Laura said...

So glad to see more "red earth" NT photos, Carole! Just can't get enough of your beautiful outback there! Your photos and commentary are wonderful! Thanks so much!

Dianne said...

It's a very different world up there Carole ... a "Trapping Yard" so simple but so effective.

Beth, ...".E." Lizard Breath Speaks said...

looks so bare. was that sort of a dogwood bloom? it did look so similar. so amazing to see those blooms (purple ones) with it looking so so dry. what a wild sight. ( :

Carole M. said...

no it wasn't a dogwood Beth --- it's a close-to-the-ground flower and like the pink one, both have those plump-succulent style leaves. I guess growing in that harsh environment they need water-storing leaf types to survive at all.

HOOTIN ANNI said...

I enjoyed this tour very much...tho dry and arid, the scenery is awesome. Love the 'watering hole'.